a landscape lover's blog

garden tales from a Brit abroad

Championing historic gardens

The Historic Gardens Foundation is a small, dynamic NGO that champions important places across the globe. It operates through a worldwide network of garden enthusiasts and a handsome 50-page journal, … Continue reading

Featured · Leave a comment

Spring running lightly all over the world

In the two-thousand-year-old Sanskrit epic poem Ramayana, Hanuman the monkey god encourages a group of bears to join him in a Wine Forest. Soon the animals are drunk, “a mob … Continue reading

Featured · 8 Comments

Anglo-chinois gardens

It can be hard to grasp the shift in France from the great classical, geometric gardens of Le Nôtre and his followers to the so-called anglo-chinois style which swept the … Continue reading

February 22, 2015 · 4 Comments

An ancient landscape

In Rajasthan’s Pali district, slabs of granite loom up from the earth, sculpted by complex chemical interactions, wind and weather. Scattered around are the few shrubs and trees that can … Continue reading

January 29, 2015 · 7 Comments

Abbotsbury Sub-Tropical Gardens

“Garden of the Year” is a strange award, and one that for me has led to disappointment and even bafflement. So I am delighted today to have a guest post … Continue reading

August 21, 2014 · 3 Comments

Dan Kiley: genius distilled

Regular readers will know of my great admiration for the American landscape designer Dan Kiley (1912-2004). I came across an unusual, unrealised garden plan of his, while conducting research for … Continue reading

August 11, 2014 · 4 Comments

Stourhead: the wrong kind of history?

Stourhead is one of the finest examples of an English landscape garden. Inspired by politics, travel, literature and painting, the eighteenth century English landscape movement introduced a radical new style of naturalistic garden … Continue reading

July 21, 2014 · 4 Comments

Grands Moulins revisited

Three years ago I wrote rather disparagingly about the jardins des Grands Moulins – Abbé Pierre, in Paris’s 13th arrondissement. It is a new, self-proclaimed sustainable park, and I wondered … Continue reading

July 18, 2014 · 3 Comments

Preserving Seaton Delaval Hall

There are a plethora of possible treatments available for historic properties. Experts talk about preservation, conservation, safeguarding, protection, restoration, adaptive re-use, repair, stabilisation, maintenance, rehabilitation, reconstruction. It can seem baffling. … Continue reading

June 24, 2014 · 2 Comments

The London Olympic Park

The start of the World Cup tomorrow has been overshadowed by concerns about the readiness of the infrastructure, and hostility from many Brazilians to their government spending so much money on … Continue reading

June 11, 2014 · 2 Comments

West Green House

Redoubtable is a word that easily comes to mind when seeking to describe Marylyn Abbott. In her native Australia, she was for many years marketing manager for the Sydney Opera House … Continue reading

June 6, 2014 · 5 Comments

Snotty gogs and tithe maps: the garden at Veddw

Veddw is a modern garden, laid out among the gentle hills of the Welsh borders. It has an unusual genesis: not a plantswoman’s garden, not a gardener’s garden. Instead, its … Continue reading

March 26, 2014 · 8 Comments

Juxtaposition

Before on this blog I have written about the mysterious French designer Elie Lainé, and about the placing of modern artworks in historic gardens. So I was delighted to see … Continue reading

March 7, 2014 · 4 Comments

Worth a thousand denials?

Ronald Reagan (I think) said that one picture was worth a thousand denials. Although digital photography has rather blurred the issue of course since Reagan’s day, we still have that … Continue reading

February 21, 2014 · 6 Comments

Historic restoration as mille-feuille

It may be the only time that historic garden conservation has been compared to a flaky French pastry. But use of the term mille-feuille was not the only unusual thing … Continue reading

January 27, 2014 · 8 Comments

The most popular sites in the world

Google has just produced a ‘heatmap‘ of the places people most like to visit. It’s a fascinating if not entirely reliable snapshot of the world’s most popular sites, based on … Continue reading

January 23, 2014 · 2 Comments

How naughty we have been

I am delighted to have joined the rosta of writers at ThinkinGardens, a British website eager to encourage serious, stimulating and critical writing about designed landscapes. My first piece is Worthy … Continue reading

January 20, 2014 · 2 Comments

Discover other landscape lover articles on these sites:

ThinkinGardens
On Botanical Photography
GGW
Soiled and Seeded
Along Life's Highway

Enter your email address to subscribe to my blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 245 other followers

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 245 other followers